Mixed Results in Western Australia Voice Referendum

         

Summary: While Australians as a whole rejected the idea of a Voice to Parliament, strong pockets of both support and opposition have emerged across Western Australia. Trends are beginning to emerge from the counting of millions of votes in the state. Several locations showed strong opposition to the Voice, including Moonyoonooka, Newdegate, Calingiri, Mukinbudin, and Cervantes. On the other hand, only a few polling places showed strong support for the proposal, mostly in remote communities in the seat of Durack. The Kimberley region and the town of Kununurra were among the strongest supporters of the Voice. However, in the Pilbara, where similar issues are present, the result aligned with the national trend. The agricultural heartland and the city of Curtin remained unsure about their stance on the Voice. Indigenous leaders expressed disappointment but pledged to continue the fight for recognition.

The results of the Voice to Parliament referendum in Western Australia have revealed a mixed response across the state. While Australians as a whole rejected the idea, strong pockets of both support and opposition have emerged. The counting of millions of votes is still ongoing, but certain trends have started to become apparent. Among the locations that showed strong opposition to the Voice were Moonyoonooka, Newdegate, Calingiri, Mukinbudin, and Cervantes. These areas had at least 80% of voters opposing the proposal. In contrast, there were only a few polling places that showed the same level of support. Most of them were mobile polling teams that visited remote communities in the Durack seat. The Kimberley region, including the towns of Fitzroy Crossing and Halls Creek, exhibited strong support for the Voice, while Kununurra and Derby voted in line with the national result. In the Pilbara region, similar to the Kimberley, where Indigenous communities face challenges, the result aligned with the national and statewide trend. Roebourne was the only major town in the Pilbara to record a majority in favor of the Voice. Notably, the agricultural heartland and the city of Curtin remained undecided on their stance. The city of Fremantle showed a mixed response, with booths closer to the center of Fremantle more in favor of the Voice, while those further out were less convinced. Indigenous leaders expressed their disappointment in the outcome but vowed to continue fighting for constitutional recognition. Despite the setback, they emphasized the need for unity and vowed to regroup and reassess their strategies.

Tags: Voice to Parliament, Western Australia, referendum, support, opposition, Kimberley region, Pilbara region, agricultural heartland, Fremantle, Indigenous leaders

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