Stone Age Discoveries in Türkiye Shed Light on Human History

         

Summary: Recent excavations in south-eastern Türkiye have led to the uncovering of a 2.3-meter stone statue of a man and a 1.2-meter sculpture of a boar. These discoveries provide new insights into the early days of human civilization. The statue, found at the Karahantepe site, is believed to be a representation of a man holding his phallus while seated on a bench decorated with a leopard. The boar sculpture, found at the Gobekli Tepe site, is the first colored sculpture dating back 11,000 years. Necmi Karul, who leads the prehistory department at Istanbul University, suggests that these findings reveal clues about social organization after the Ice Age.

Archaeologists in Türkiye have made significant discoveries in the south-eastern region, shedding light on the early days of human civilization. The latest findings include a 2.3-meter stone statue of a man and a 1.2-meter sculpture of a boar. The stone statue, found at the Karahantepe site, offers valuable insights into the ancient society that inhabited this area during the Stone Age. The statue depicts a man holding his phallus with two hands while seated on a bench adorned with a leopard. Necmi Karul, the head of the prehistory department at Istanbul University, suggests that this statue unveils a new social order that emerged after the Ice Age.

These discoveries were made as part of a project conducted in the vicinity of the UNESCO-listed Gobekli Tepe site. Gobekli Tepe is a sacred site that predates Stonehenge and the earliest Egyptian pyramids by over 7,000 years. The stone statue was found in a toppled state, broken into three sections. It is believed to have been a pillar supporting the wooden roof of one of the first rectangular buildings on the site.

In addition to the stone statue, archaeologists also unearthed a remarkable sculpture of a boar at the Gobekli Tepe site. This sculpture, measuring 1.2 meters long and 70 centimeters tall, is the first colored sculpture from this period discovered to date. The boar sculpture features red eyes and teeth, with a black-and-white body. The site where the boar sculpture was found was occupied for approximately 1,500 years before being abandoned.

The discoveries have raised questions about the purpose and symbolism of these statues. Necmi Karul points out that before leaving a site, inhabitants would typically destroy the pillars and statues, often targeting the nose and phallus. The site would then be filled in with sand and earth. The largest room at the Karahantepe site, where the stone statue was found, appears to have been a gathering place, with numerous phallus-shaped pillars and a carved man’s head. The meaning of these symbols and the reasons for the site’s eventual abandonment remain unknown. The excavation project, which covers 20 sites, will continue for several more decades, offering the potential for further discoveries and insights into the ancient civilizations of Türkiye.

Tags: Türkiye, excavations, stone statue, boar sculpture, prehistoric civilization, Gobekli Tepe, social organization, archaeology, ancient sites, Stone Age

Share: